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Obviously, traffic is a problem. I've given up riding a bike a while ago after I've overlooked and rammed a parked car. As a pedestrian, I've got a little more reaction time, because I'm slower. The basic problem is that an oncoming vehicle can be completely invisible to me if my blind spot happens to fall on it.  

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My eye doctor tells me regularly that my eyesight is at 10%. This is determined by the usual letters and numbers in various sizes, which are projected on the wall. Sometimes you can still see the panels with the many E's showing to the left, right, up or down. The largest are at the top, towards the bottom they are getting smaller. 10% equals the top two or three lines that I can still see. With my glasses, of course, without glasses, I don't see a thing on these panels. But what means 10% then?

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About fast objects that I am confronted with (e.g. cars) and the associated difficulties I have spoken before. The same applies vice versa when I myself am quickly moving: I see things too late or react too late.

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Seeing is like any perceptive process is selective. We see certain things consciously other we overlook. This is useful protection against an otherwise not hand able information overload. But what astonishes me again and again how punctually people see.

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Shopping also has its pitfalls. I don't particularly like the serviced counters. The goods are usually presented very nicely behind the glass, but I can only roughly see what they are, not to mention the prices. I can only say: - I would like a piece of that, please. And I point to it. This is a shame, since the same range of sausage or cheese is not always packed in the refrigerated section. But I can also make it a little adventure by simply pointing at something without knowing what it is and letting me surprise what I get. Like this, I discover something new..